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are found in tokyo's water supply, as the u.s. bans the import of some japanese foods. >> right there. right there! >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a monster of the deep. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. we will not surrender. those words, the defiant libyan leader moammar gadhafi, who made his first public appearance in a week. despite the allied-imposed no-fly zone, libyan troops continued their unrelenting attacks against rebel-held cities where conditions are described as desperate. the u.s. military says it is considering all options. explosions were heard in tripoli this morning. and susan mcginnis is in washington with more on this story. good morning, susan. >> hi, good morning, betty. the mission in libya is accomplishing its goal, including grounding gadhafi's air force. but as criticism of the operation grows, along with the cost, the u.s. is looking to hand off control. despite a fourth night of allied air strikes pounding libya, leader
are without food, clean water and electricity. we have team coverage from the epicenter of thedy sast to the u.s. greg, what is the latest? >> a cold dark night here in the fishing village and the folks probably went to bed thinking of what the prime minister had to say. he told them it would take determination to get them through this. just up the coast, the nuclear complex with so much problems in the past couple of days, today, another reactor facing the possibility of a meltdown. they say they are in control of the situation. but the evacuation from the region around the reactors continues and the possibility of poisoning from radioactivity also going forward. dozens are testing positive for that. now to the number. there is one official here, in one region who said yesterday that 10,000 people were missing. now he is saying he feels that 10,000 people are dead in his region alone. that may add to the figure. we traveled today and we notice shortages are a problem. of food, of fuel and power in this village, of everything people need to get by. that is why relief is rushing to this area. tod
have been discontinued. japanese officials said today they are asking the u.s. government for help. charlie d'agata is in niigata, japan, with more. good morning, charlie. >> reporter: good morning to you, betty. nobody is watching the events unfolding at the nuclear power plant more closely than the people here. many who were evacuated from the region around that plant and wonder if they'll ever be able to go home. fire trucks resumed blasting water onto japan's crippled nuclear power plant as crews raced to restore power to the facility. as early as today, they hope to feed electricity to at least two of the six overheated reactors, and get crucial water pumps working again. >> if the cooling systems in the reactors and fuel pumps are basically sound, and then the power comes on, then we might look at that moment as the beginning of the end of this crisis. >> reporter: but even if the power starts back up, it's not clear the water pumps will. they may have already suffered too much damage. there are also fears that getting power back online could spark another explosion. smoke bi
. police are searching for possible accomplices. >>> in business news the federal reserve says the u.s. economy continues toex pand gradually while some manufacturers and retailers are starting to pass on higher crude oil prices to customers. >>> on wednesday the fed released the so-called beige book report. that's a survey of economic conditions in the 12 districts across the country. the document says overall economic activity continued to expand at a modest to moderate pace in january and early february. it says most districts reported continued rises in corporate production and con sumtder spending. meanwhile, the report notes that manufacturers and retailers have passed on higher costs of crude oil and raw materials to clients and or are planning to do so in the near future. this trend will likely continue if commodity prices keep rising. >>> now, apple chief executive steve jobs returned from medical leave for a day to unveil a new lighter ipad tablet computer equipped with two cameras. >> thanks for coming. thank you. it's really thin. and it comes in two colors. >> jobs made hi
and the u.s. nuclear chief says the water evaporated. if they are exposed they can catch fire, melt, and release large amounts of ridation into the air. we are told crews are still working on a new power line that would restore the electricity there in theory and get the water pumps back up and running. officials say the cold snap is slowing down their effort but not word on when that cable might be connected. in the meantime, 200 courageous plant workers, 180 of them, are jack belling to cool the reactors by hand. they are risking their lives to prevent a catastrophe. a total meltdown is a stunning blow after the earthquake and tsunami that devastated the northeast portion of japan. we got dramatic new video to fox of people trying to save eve other as the monster wave swept through the town. look at this. (speaking japanese). >>shepard: a week later search teams are still digging for the dead. and survivors gather what is last of their belongings. but for many, there is simply nowhere to go. expire towns are wiped off the map and it will take likely years to rebuild. so we will ge
are considering other ways to help those suffering in libya. hillary clinton says the u.s. military might have a role to play, such as getting supplies to where they're needed. the u.s. secretary of state acknowledged direct intervention would face major opposition. the arab league says it's against any foreign interference. >>> now, some people taking part in the uprising against colonel gadhafi say they want western forces to give support, to prevent more attacks by government planes. some politicians in washington say the u.s. should do just that. but the defense secretary told congress it wouldn't be easy. >> if it's ordered, we can do it. but the really is, and people, there's a lot of, frankly, loose talk about some of these military options. and let's just call a spade a spade. a no-fly zone begins with an attack on libya. to destroy the air defenses. that's the way you'd do a no-fly zone. and then you can fly planes around the country and not worry about our guys being shot down. but that's the way it starts. >> i'm not endorsing it. >> no, i understand that. but it also requires more
senators gary hart and norm coleman assess president obama's decision to use u.s. military power in libya. >> ifill: then, we get a report from a japan battered by nuclear disaster and now facing elevated radiation levels in its tap water. >> lehrer: miles o'brien looks at the future for u.s. nuclear power in the wake of the japan crisis. >> ifill: ray suarez reports on how the north african nation of morocco is working to avoid becoming the next target of regional unrest. >> reporter: in washington, morocco's foreign minister gave us an overview of king mohammed's planned reforms for a country facing some of the same discontents as its neighbors. >> you know what i feel like? i feel all the time like a cat on a hot tin roof! >> lehrer: and jeffrey brown remembers legendary film star elizabeth taylor who died today at age 79. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people des
group for piracy off the coast of somalia and out of that has emerged for workgroups. the u.s. leads a workgroup on working with the maritime industry of situational awareness. this is called worker three. what we look at our trends. so far this fiscal year which commenced on the first of what tober. we spent 81 piracy events. of those 37 were successful. again, what the fight by fight lane dollars payoff. if you are 3781, that would probably get you in the hall of fame if your plane based all. and these are generally viewed from a country where the daily wages maybe $2 a day. the site by $5 million sun is a lucrative business to be in. if you have a large diaspora within somalia, and a largely unemployed youth, this is literally at the opportunity of a lifetime. so what is working? we have to the international maritime organization a number of best management practices again for commercial vessels with height reports, it typically means providing -- eliminating the need to access the vessel, but ultimately increasing speed. other vessels that infuse these best management practices t
to see you on this monday. i'm terrell brown in for betty nguyen. the pentagon says the u.s.-led air assault on libya has been very effective, inflicting heavy damage on government forces. the air strikes included over 120 cruise missiles, bt bombers and jet fighters. one of moammar gadhafi's compounds in tripoli was hit. but u.s. officials say gadhafi is not a target. the libyan dictator promises a long, hard war. susan mcginnis is in washington with more. susan, good morning to you. >> hi, good morning, terrell. after a weekend of heavy air strikes on libya, the main issue in washington is, where to go from here. u.s. officials are now planning a more limited role for u.s. forces going forward. u.s. officials are not planning to lead the mission in libya much longer. >> we expected in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. >> reporter: following a weekend of missile strikes and air patrols, defense secretary robert gates said the pentagon will soon hand over the reins to either the french and british, or to nato. his comments came as american
: at this point, 7 ships are headed to japan including the u.s.s. ronald reagan that has medical facilities as well as air lift capabilities to move people and supplies. the u.s. has 38,000 troops who were already stationed in japan. the defense department put out a video of marines ready to head to mainland japan with other assets. secretary gates says the military wants to do whatever is needed by the government of japan or by the government in tokyo. >> we have the ronald reagan closing in japan. we are sending another ship, we're pulling in helicopters from around the region, from okinawa and so on. so those ships can be used for helicopter operations in humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. >> molly: as far as american citizens in japan, so far the u.s. government has no reports of serious injuries or deaths. >> jamie: molly, the government is downplaying somewhat the risk of the radiation but search and rescue seems viable at this point. what teams other than we spoke will be going there. >> molly: they are serious experts. usig says two teams have been deployed to japan at the
on during a calm day at the wind farm. heated 57 million u.s. homes. simmered grandma's chicken noodle soup. melted tons of recycled glass. roasted millions of coffee beans. provided electricity for nearly 29 million home computers. heated your bathwater. cooked your takeout. lit your way home. we helped america import less of its energy. cleared the air by burning cleaner than other fuel sources, with less pollutants and no mercury. and tomorrow, we could do even more. we're cleaner, domestic, abundant and ready now. we're america's natural gas. the smarter power today. learn more at anga.us. what are you looking at? logistics. ben? the ups guy? no, you see ben, i see logistics. logistics? think--ben is new markets. ben is global access-- china and beyond. ben is a smarter supply chain. ben is higher margins. happier customers... everybody wins. logistics. exactly. see you guys tomorrow. fresh aftershock s injapan as signs of the nuclear crisis begin to show up in the food supply. >>> in libya, a rebel plane crashes. this is the when they meet to discuss military action. is the u.s. on the
for about 20 countries and includes the west coast of the u.s., hawaii, as well, alaska, as well. >> yeah, i understand, rob, we've been hearing there's a full coastal evacuation in effect in hawaii right now. and we get this sheet and i know you have it too of the coordinates and the estimated arrival time. what does that translate into in terms of waves and what people can expect? and really how much time they have to get out of harm's way? >> well, the pictures that we've been showing, those dramatic pictures where you see water and debris on all sorts of stuff moving rapidly inland, being pushed in like that and tens of miles inland, there was little warning. this is very close to the shoreline, and the epicenter was about 80 miles offshore. so the wave -- the tsunami after the quake happened hit that shoreline about 15 to 20 minutes later. virtually no warning at all. and you get the full force of that impact without any sort of buffer from the ocean. now, as this thing travels across the ocean in all directions down to the south up to the north off to the east, it does begin to lose it
morning, joel. yeah, washington is watching higher oil prices, and considering u.s. dependence on foreign oil, it's now looking at a much closer alternative. the white house is considering tapping the nation's oil reserves to try to put a cap on runaway oil prices. >> all matters have to be on the table when you go through -- when you see the difficulty coming out of the economic crisis we're in, and the fragility of it. >> reporter: the strategic petroleum reserves, the u.s. government's emergency oil supply, holds 727 million barrels right now. that's enough to provide the nation the oil it needs for a couple of months. after hurricane katrina, the government released 30 million barrels. oil prices dropped nearly 4%. during the first gulf war, 34 million barrels were released and prices dropped a third in one day. but the price of gasoline up 33 cents a gallon in the past two weeks, drivers will take any break they can get. >> i used to make it three, four days with $75 of gas. now every two days i've got to put $75 in this car. so, you know, it's ridiculous. >> as a student it's kind o
, not only in the u.s. but throughout asia, africa, and south america that are all contributing to higher crude oil prices and consequently higher gasoline prices at the pump. >> reporter: those higher gas prices came as many were starting to feel better about the economy, but now any extra cash may be going right into the the tank. >> i think it's crazy. >> reporter: jason king spends $40 more a month on gas. >> pretty soon i'm going to have to start thinking about riding a bike or other means of transportation, definitely. >> reporter: in fact, those skyrocketing prices have some giving up the road for the rails. metro use in los angeles, up 10%. and across the country commuters are using the latest technology, smartphone apps and social media, to find the cheapest gas, anything to save a buck. >> everybody i know is trying to carpool and fill up the car as much as possible. >> reporter: gas prices hit a high in february, but in the weeks ahead spring is when prices typically rise the most. miguel almaguer, nbc news, los angeles. >> and as we mentioned at the top of the newscast, the ob
are willing to die for him, says the u.s. will face a bloody war if they intervene. bill: jonathan hunt, live at the libyan-tunisian border, hello there. >> reporter: good morning to you. colonel gadhafi appears to be as defiant as ever this morning. in a speech to his people, marking the 34th anniversary of the peoples' congress and in front of what appears to be a hand-picked audience, he said that he and his supporters will, quote, fight to the last man and to the last woman. he railed against intervention, warning the united states and others not to troy to intervene in the situation in libya. he says he and his people -- [inaudible] >> [broken speech] >> he is building -- he is fire up supporters by implying this is all an international plot to oust him. meanwhile he says al-qaeda is prompting some of the violence against him. >> [inaudible] >> -- united states and al-qaeda combined, but this is the reality world in which colonel gadhafi appears to live right now. there is also violence in several cities right now. the pro ga-- >> [broken speech] >> here on the border we still have a gro
to what we are seeing in japan. thanks again. >> thank you. >> the u.s. gets roughly 20% of energy from nuclear power and there have been calls from both sides of the isaisle to increas the number. in the wake of the disaster chuck todd asked chuck schumer if he's rethinking that position. >> we're going to have to see what happens here obviously. it's still -- still things are happening, but the bottom line is we do have to free ourselves of independence from foreign oil and the other half of the globe. libya showed that. prices are up. our economy is hurt by it or could be hurt by it. i'm willing to look at nuclear. it has to be done safely and carefully. >> let's bring in nbc news white house correspondent mike viqueira. where does the energy debate stand as we move into the new work week in washington, d.c., especially based on what we are seeing coming out of japan? >> reporter: it's interesting. it's a matter of energy policy and politics as well. it was just a day before yesterday, thomas, when the president of the united states at a press conference friday here at the executive
into their cause. that is half of their active force. the united states involved in a big way, as well. the u.s.a. ronald -- u.s.s. ronald reagan and 20 rescue missions were run and choppers from there. six were in operation, rescue operations. you name it. at the end, it all comes to down to the japanese people. again in small coastal town we watched you might see a boat behind me. there were boats, there were trucks, there were cars lining the streets upside-down swept by the tsunami which had hit here on friday. most of those were taken away by the end of the day, very determined people, indeed. >> gregg: earthquake in japan hitting very close to home. many japanese-americans trying to get in touch with their loved ones. one community on the west coast springing into action to help victims. casey stegall is live in little tokyo section of los angeles. >> reporter: a lot of people don't know this but 300,000 japanese-americans call the state of california home. that is the largest population in all of the united states. little tokyo, a neighborhood back here behind me in downtown los angeles,
reportedly near or on a bus carrying u.s. soldiers at the frankfurt airport. amy kellogg is following this breaking story live from london. amy. >> reporter: yes, we're trying to piece together the information. we're getting it at this point various press agencies on the ground, pretty much now the frankfurt police and the u.s. military, who are investigating this. two people dead, we understand, one, a u.s. soldier, when allegedly a 21-year-old shooter from kosovo opened fire on a bus, carrying u.s. soldiers, at the frankfurt airport. now, this just happened, so, again, we're just piecing together this information. we believe it's one soldier killed, and the driver of the bus, and then two people taken to the hospital. you know the airport base, the medical center, which is part of the u.s. military s. based very close to frankfurt and that is the biggest u.s. military hospital outside the united states. it's where soldiers coming from iraq and afghanistan are treated. again, we don't have information about the actual soldiers on that bus, where they were going, to or from, but we kn
patrolling off libya's coast, this as the u.s. gets ready to hand over control of the no fly zone to the alliance. whatever that alliance is. we don't know at this time. in the meantime pro car davi forces ratchet up attacks in an eastern city of that country, stopping rebel groups there, but the international air strikes continue and now we have reports that those attacks forced pro qaddafi forces to withdraw tanks from another rebel-held city in the west. a whole lot goes on there today, jon. jon: the libyan leader remains as defiant as ever, appearing from his compound in tripoli and vowing to win the historic battle. now there's word, though, that mommar qaddafi may be planning his exit strategy. secretary of state hillary clinton, weighing in on that on abc's "world news with diane sawyer". >> this is what we hear from so many sources, diane, it is a constanto. >> today? >> today, yesterday, the day before. some of it, i'll be very, you know -- it's my personal opinion -- some of it is theater. a lot of it is just the way he bee haves. it's somewhat unpredictable. but some of
is allowing family members of u.s. government workers in japan to evacuate. arrangements are being made for charter flights. an earlier white house order told americans in japan to stay at least 50 miles away from the fukushima nuclear plant. japanese military helicopters have been dropping water on that crippled plant today. they're hoping the aerial assault will cool off the reactors and avoid a total meltdown. >>> the japanese stock market opened lower today. taking back yesterday's gains. the yen soared to a new high against the dollar on the currency markets. >>> finally, while the world watches the tragic events in japan, many wonder what we can do here to help. this includes one little massachusetts girl. >> she sprang into action selling her most precious items in hopes that she can help those who need it the most. here's tricia taskey of our affiliate wggb. >> here. >> this is autumn. and it's going to be hard for me to give her away. >> reporter: 7-year-old sage freeman is parting with some of her toys. >> this is tigger. >> tigger is going to be hard. >> reporter: the florenc
... after including the u-s began firing missles and flying air missions over libya... to enforce a united nntions no- fly zone.but the mission has not been without criticism from republicans, who say the president has not done enough to prevent the u-s from entering a longgdrawn out conflict.as the white house seeks to answer those who say theemission is nnt clearly defined.senntor john mccain had this to say about his expectations for the president's remarks... on one hand, it's humanitarian. on the other hand, they say gadhafi must go. the president, i hope, will clarify that nato announced on sunday that it will take over the entire libya mission... from the enforcement of the united nattons no-fly zone, to the protection of civilians believed to be threatened by loyalist troops. meantime, many of those civilians are giving thanks for the coalition airstrikes... that have helped give those rebels... seeking to unseat moammar gadhafi... the chance to regroup.stay tuned to fox45 news at 10 for the latest on what president obama has to say about what haapens from here.megan gillilaad,
. it could spark intervention from the u.s. and its allies within hours. and david kerley is with the president, who is beginning a trip to latin america, in brazil. good morning, david? >> reporter: the president is in brazil now. waiting to see if the unpredictable moammar gadhafi heeds his warning. and gadhafi may have answered in the last several hours. and that letter that you mentioned, calling the u.n. resolution invalid. and his forces continue to strike at the rebels in the east. this morning, a striking image. a libyan fighter plane, shot down by rebel forces battling moammar gadhafi. the libyan leader had reportedly been bombing the rebels inside his country, despite president obama's stark warning just 12 hours earlier. >> a cease-fire must be implemented immediately. let me be clear. these terms are not negotiable. >> reporter: within hours of that statement, gadhafi's government scrambled, saying it's declared a cease-fire. but this morning, the fighting continues. and there are new questions about if and when the united states and its allies will have to enf
. on the "newshour" tonight: we update the military operation and get two views on what the u.s. and its allies can do to stop moammar qaddafi's forces. >> lehrer: then, judy woodruff talks to the editor of the yemen times about the growing protests in that arab nation. >> they want a life where they don't have to think of future and be equal. >> brown: paul solman has the story of the widening gap in american society between the very rich and the rest of the country. >> the top 1% is living well, and they don't get it. they don't get what is happening to this country and i feel like we're creating a third world country subculture within this country. >> lehrer: and ray suarez looks at new census numbers showing one in six americans is hispanic. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds great cars. and you'll find in the people at toyota, all across america. >> auto companies make huge profits. >> last year, chevron made a lot of money. >> where does it go? >> every penny and more we
is in recess. we are going to focus on the story from libya. and your calls and reaction as u.s. and allies strike those targets. 202-737-0002, our line for democrats. 202-737-0001 for republicans. for independence, the number to call is 202-628-0205. here are some of the headlines from domestic newspapers beginning with "new york post." "take that gaddafi." "strike one." an air assault, no ground troops, but tomahawk missiles continue to strike those targets. some other headlines beginning with the chicago tribune. u.s. allies are attacking libya. most of it right along the coast. you can see along the mediterranean sea. l.a. times -- attacks on libya. you can see from the u.s. and navy destroyers. operation "odyssey dawn" was the name of the operation. from the "richmond times- dispatch", the u.s. striking libyan forces. and from the "miami herald", libya under fire. you can join the conversation online at twitter.com/cspanwj. caller: good morning. i would like to know what the heck is going on. here we are and another freakin' war. congress is on vacation. who is minding the store? i'm a
no action on the nation's gridirons this fall. and quake questions-- this town prepared in the u.s. for an earthquake as strong as the one that hit japan. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> mitchell: and good evening. it is already sunday morning in japan, and another major aftershock has just hit the country which is still digging out after friday's disastrous 8.9-magnitude earthquake. here's the latest-- an explosion at a nuclear power plant forced 170,000 people to evacuate while an emergency was declared tonight at a second reactor in the same complex. roads and buildings throughout the area have been devastated, and hundreds of thousands are stranded without food or water. we have correspondents all along the earthquake zone tonight and we begin with ben tracy in tokyo. >> reporter: with more cameras on the ground, we are now getting our closest look yet at the extent of the damage. it is simply overwhelming. in hard-hit sendai, a city of one million people, police say they found as many as 300 bodies washed up on the beach as the
obama from the east room of the white house essentially saying the u.s. will help lead the international enforcement of a no-fly zone over libya. he also took some time there outlining what american forces will not be doing. >> the united states is not going to deploy ground troops into libya and we are not going the use force to go beyond a well-defined goal. >> in moments i'll be speaking live with nic robertson in libya and wolf blitzer about who makes the next move here. that's in just a moment. we're also learning here as we're staying on top of the story in japan, we're learning trace amounts of radiation have reached the united states' west coast, all the way from this fukushima daiichi power plant in japan. so i'll be speaking with the mayor of los angeles shortly. and we'll find out what the new danger rating is right around fukushima, where that power plant is still out of control here. it's been one week to the day after the earthquake and tsunami hit. looked at this video here, video that was flagged for us, showing some of the new views we're getting from the powerful tsunam
. the u.s. sent one other urban search and rescue team. that team is from los angeles. of course, our coverage will be online on myfoxdc.com. let's check back in with mary ann after -- rafferty with a look at japan. >> there was a loud bang followed by white smoke and a third reactor of the power planted. it is likely that a hydrogen explosion occurred. >> reporter: authorities have been frantically trying to cool the plant down following a system failure in the wake of a massive earthquake and tsunami. the government has evacuated tens of thousands near the plant. monday also brought a powerful 6.2 aftershock to japan. residents are still scrambling to evacuate in the wake of friday's massive 9.0 magnitude quake. millions of quake survivors are struggling to find food and water and drivers are being rationed small amounts of fuel has some gas station are running out. the u.s. state department urges no americans to travel there. japanese-americans are struggling to connect with anyone. >> it is busy all the time. we tried e-mail and when we got on the e-mail and send it out, it came
is preparing his own take on the u.s. role in the war. >>> also this morning, new fears in japan as radiation levels reach stunning new heights, and the air around the damaged nuclear plant is no longer the worry. rather, it's the water. >>> also something we're keeping an eye on right now in great britain. budget cuts are coming at a high cost for british leaders. protesters on the streets this morning clashing with police officers over proposed austerity measures. we'll have the latest from there. again, this is happening right now. from the cnn center, this is your cnn start morning for this march the 26th. i'm t.j. holmes. we do want to start with a new and disturbing incident in tripoli. this happened today. it's a story that maybe highlights the brutality of a regime that so many people are now fighting against. we want to bring in our cnn international correspondent nic robertson with the latest. tell us what happened. >> reporter: well, t.j., it all began this morning over breakfasttime when a lady came into the hotel, a middle aged appeared to be very respectable lady came into the h
earthquakes the world has ever seen. 8.9 quake hting japan overnight. the waves now barreling towards the u.s. pictures we are seeing out of japan are unimaginable. it's wave after wave literally swallowing up cars, boats and homes. some terrifying moments in an airport outside of tokyo when the quake hit. watch this video. now there is one report. you find the capital city of tokyo. that report that confirmed. but an earthquake of horrific proportions causing buildings to shake and the tsunami that followed. seldom have we seen images like this. welcome to "america's newsroom." martha: this quake struck just after 3:00 p.m. local time in japan while most of us were sleeping. this was the scene. unbelievably powerful waves crashing ashore causing wired spread destruction. there are massive fires being dealt with and a nuclear emergency. we have more details on that. bill: there was so much to watch and do have, we'll do our best it, the 7th largest earthquake ever record. it's the largest to hit japan. evacuations underway in several coastal towns. trace gallagher joins us with more on that.
clinton told the house foreign affairs committee that there quote no options off limits. should the u.s. intervene? joining me for today's two at the top is the washington correspondent for "time" magazine. it's critical for the u.s. to handle this right. if they do intervene, what is doing it the right way? >> well, they're trying to figure that out at the moment. it's been a long time since the u.s. did active mail temilitary interventions for humanitarian purposes. they did it in the 1990s after the fall of the cold war in places like somalia and vulcans. iraq in the post 9/11 era, made doing that kind of thing much harder because u.s. intervention was seen as the form of aggression. they're trying to strike a balance between the demands to launch humanitarian assistance backed by some form of u.s. military protection and broader international protection with the danger of crossing the line into what might be seen as a more aggressive military intervention into an arab country. >> the europeans have a big stake in this as well. there's a huge investment in oil fields there. there cou
american ally, u.s. war ships arriving earlier today and with help and supplies and our doug mche willway new live from washingtons and what's the american help for relief on this. >> the aircraft carrier u.s.s. reagan and battle groups as well as other military personnel conducted well over 20 missions providing humanitarian arrive and orion aircraft over debris fields trying to judge, and also looking for survivors. >> a 60-year-old man out to sea clinging to the roof. and he went to his house and got some belongses and out to sea and his apparently his wife remains missing. they're providing civilian to humanitarian aid and two search and rescue teams from west fairfax, virginia, and others to the quake zone and much equipment must come by roadway and the roads of course have been heavily damaged, no he it willing when they will get there with equipment and they are among rescue teams sent from ten different countries and the american red cross, also accepting donations, go to foxnews.com for information how to donate to them. the red cross basically serving as a secondary roll to the
's forces are surrounding the rebels. how involved should the u.s. get? >> gregg: new details now on a major nuclear scare in japan. japanese officials say radioactivity levels very close to the nuclear plant have gone down in the last several hours. this plant facing a potentially disastrous meltdown after an explosion this morning. take a look at these incredible pictures, clouds of smoke rising from up the reactor area. safety officials are scrambling to contain the damage and evacuating 140,000 people in a 12-mile perimeter. adam housley is streaming live with the latest north of tokyo? >> we're about 20 miles from where we were earlier this morning, 70 miles north and to the eat of tokyo, halfway to where the reactors are. the location we are at southern end of where the tsunami came through here. pictures waf been seen the last few days, you can see some of the destruction. car next to me was carried down the street. there is a car over on the distance that was up on the top of fence. in this was a power structure and some sort of a banner that was hanging across the intersection. in t
'll get our first indication of the strength of the event on the u.s. mainland, over the next 15 minutes and that is when forecasts show the waves will reach san francisco. whether or not they'll be damaging, or even noticeable, has yet to be seen. >> japan's east coast, hit with a 23-foot tsunami, shortly after the quake struck. police along the country's northeast coast, report finding the bodies of two to three hundred people, japan railways working to find a missing passenger train. while the government reports the giant wave swept away a ship, carrying about 100 people. >> unfortunately we expect to get more reports like those, 8.9 magnitude quake is japan's worst on record as we say, one of the worst in world history. and rocked cities hundreds of miles from epicenter an spawned dozens and dozens, as we hear it of aftershocks. >> look at one of japan's three nuke we're power plants, that are having some problems right now, the worst in the city of onahana where police ordered evacuations where a fire disabled a cooling system there. no reports of radiation leaking, secretary of sta
, the u.s. supreme court in an 8 to 1 vote said that jury verdict has to be set aside that the first amendment protects the messages of this group. now, chief justice john roberts who wrote the opinion said that the protest was entirely legal. the group abided by the local restrictions of how far away to be from the church. they were not violent and the message while repugnant to many does get into questions of public concern about the military, about gay rights and about the catholic church. he said at the end of the opinion, speech is powerful. it can move people to action. it can move people to tears and it can even inflict great pain, but the government cannot react by punishing the speaker. there was one dissenter today, samuel alito who said this is not ultimately about public issue, but a private action and private attack on a single-family and single father and the father should be able to sue for damages. controversial decision, but clearly, we know where the supreme court feels because of the 8 to 1 vote, contessa. >> thank you, pete. breaking news out of germany, we know t
of help the united states is prepared to give. hi, chris. >> yeah, just got off the phone with u.s. forces japan saying they have not yet received a formal request from the japanese government. he also said this is a very different mission than what we're used to. he says think of haiti, things like that where we came in and jumped in and started to help. he said every step of the way has to be mapped out and approved by the japanese government. it's a technologically savvy country with a lot of pride. everything has to be formally requested before the u.s. military can act. let's take a look real quick at the map and i can show you a bit about what the u.s. is dealing with here. you can see the plant, there are helicopter crews running relief missions right around in that area. and for a second day, those u.s. helicopter crews came back with low-level contamination of radiation. they had to be soaped down and all their clothes destroyed. and they came up all clean. they're now being told some of the helicopter crews in and around this area are being told to keep their sleeves rolled down,
general wesley clark. after that i discussion on the state of u.s. public education. >> i am a numbers guy. >> as a visual op-ed columnist for "in york times," charlie blow uses trawls and brett -- charts and graphs i do not decide that will talk about a subject and look for the data. i search for that that person see if there is something interesting and that agrees with an opinion that i have or sometimes what surprises me and what surprised by readers. >> sunday night it 8:00 on c- span. >> no reporter's roundtable on the role of nato in libya. from "washington journal," this is 55 minutes. scully is with "national journal" and we have missy ryan -- pentagon reporter. how significant is it that nato will step up and take the lead? guest: it is an important step but not everything the obama administration wanted. what they have done it is often rise nato countries to enforce the no-fly zone but that is only the first part of the u.n. security council resolution. what the nato countries did not do is authorize the full mandate, which is all necessary means required to protect civilians.
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